The King of Kush in BigBuds Magazine Tags: king of kush bret bogue brett bigbuds

Article by Steve Davis, on Jul. 14th 2011

Bret Bogue is a renowned medical marijuana seed breeder and marijuana grow expert who has won the Cannabis Cup, been featured in High Times and several movies, created a medical cannabis university and helped bring the legendary Kush medical marijuana strain to its high prominence.  He’s the type of marijuana breeder, pioneer and activist who stands up to drug warriors and relentlessly pushes to improve marijiuana genetics, potency and legalization.

Bogue loves to teach marijuana cultivation techniques such as "super-cropping," and he revels in developing or improving strains such as Grape Ape, Tangerine Kush,  ChemDawg, Kaia Kush, Sour Grapes, Goo, Levity, and Very Berry Haze.

It’s no surprise they call Bret the “King of Kush.” Big Buds caught up with Bret Bogue as he multi-tasked his way through another OG Kush day in California…

Big Buds: Bret, when I heard them call you the King of Kush, I knew I had to start by asking you about the origins of Kush.
Bret Bogue:  OG Kush is originally from Pakistan and Afghanistan. Seeds were gathered in that region and brought to Florida in the early 1970’s and was grown there in the Latin American community until the late 1980’s.  By 1992, it had been brought to California.  A young breeder named Josh started making a buzz with OG Kush in the Hollywood/LA scene.  By 1995, Josh had given it to TH Seeds in Amsterdam, which is run by Adam Dunn. He also gave it to  B-Real from Cypress Hill.  Thanks in part to these three people, OG Kush became a hugely sought-after strain, with a top value of $7500 per pound.  Nowadays, there are many different variations of OG Kush, such as Larry OG, Snoop OG, Valley OG, Tahoe OG, and on and on. Many seed companies claim to have seeds of OG Kush, but there are so many variations, it’s difficult to know if you have the actual, original OG Kush.  The original is an Indica-based strain but over the years OG Kush has been crossbred into many different hybrids.

Big Buds: I heard that OG Kush is somehow related to Chemdawg.
Bret: Chemdawg originated on the East coast of USA.  There were 5 friends who created Chemdawg, Chemdawg 91, and Chem D.  These strains can only be found in cutting form.  There are certain companies who claim to have original seeds, but at this point, there’s no proof to back that up.  The crew continues to work on the east coast. Chemdawg is a hybrid Indica/Sativa mix.

See the full article here: http://bigbudsmag.com/grow/article/king-kush-marijuana-july-2011

Study: Marijuana Not Linked With Long Term Cognitive Impairment Tags: Study: Marijuana Not Linked With Long Term Cognitive Impairment

The idea that “marijuana makes you dumb” has long been embodied in the stereotype of the slow, stupid stoner, seen in numerous Hollywood movies and TV comedies and going unquestioned by much of American culture. But a new study says no: the researchers followed nearly 2,000 young Australian adults for eight years and found that marijuana has little long-term effect on learning and memory— and any cognitive damage that does occur as a result of cannabis use is reversible.

Participants were aged 20-24 at the start of the study, which was part of a larger project on community health.  Researchers categorized them as light, heavy, former or non-users of cannabis based on their answers to questions about  marijuana habits.

Light use was defined as smoking monthly or less frequently; heavy use was weekly or more often. Former users had to have not smoked for at least a year. Fully 72% of the participants were non-users or former users; 18% were light users and 9% were heavy current users. Prior studies have found that drug users do accurately report their consumption levels in surveys like this as long as anonymity is guaranteed and there are no negative consequences for telling the truth.

MORE: U.S. Rules That Marijuana Has No Medical Use. What Does Science Say?

Participants took tests of memory and intelligence three times over the eight year period the study. They were also asked about how their marijuana use had changed. When the results were at last tabulated, researchers found that there were large initial differences between the groups, with the current marijuana smokers performing worse on tests that required them to recall lists of words after various periods of time or remember numbers in the reverse order from the one in which they were presented.

However, when the investigators controlled for factors like education and gender, almost all of these differences disappeared.  The lower education levels of the pot smokers — and their greater likelihood of being male — had made it look like marijuana had significantly affected their intelligence.  In fact, men simply tend to do worse than women on tests of verbal intelligence, while women generally underperform on math tests. The relative weighting of the tests made the impact of pot  look worse than it was.

Researchers then explored whether quitting cannabis would affect the one difference that remained, which was poorer performance by heavy users on a test that required immediate recall of a list of nouns.  They found that heavy users who had quit by the end of the study were no longer distinguishable on this measure from those who had never used.

The authors, who were led by Robert Tait at the Centre for Mental Health Research at Australian National University, conclude:

[T]he adverse impacts of cannabis use on cognitive functions either appear to be related to pre-existing factors or are reversible in this community cohort even after potentially extended periods of use. These findings may be useful in motivating individuals to lower cannabis use, even after an extensive history of heavy intake.

But what about all the prior research linking cannabis with lasting negative effects on cognition? Those studies may have been confounded by the fact that in many cases, heavy users were tested after being abstinent for only one day — so their performance could have been affected either by residual marijuana in their systems or by irritability or other effects of withdrawal.  Studies that have looked at heavy users after longer periods of abstinence generally concur with the new research, finding no lingering effect on cognition.

MORE: Are Stoners Really Dumb, or Do They Just Think They Are?

Other research concludes that the “stupid stoner” image itself can impair performance, with subjects essentially living down to what's expected of them.  But the literature overall now suggests that those “I'm not as think as you stoned I am,” moments are likely limited to the high itself.

The research was published in the journal Addiction.

LIVE GGECO Class Sign Up! (California) Tags: live class cannabis education marijuana
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California Residents - Join the Collective! Tags: California collective medical marijuana cannabis

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Please fill out and send  Collective Application & Membership Agreement  along with a Copy of California I.D. and your Medical Recommendation

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KAIA KUSH in HIGH TIMES MAGAZINE
Category: Press
Tags: kaia kush bret bogue apothecary genetics high times magazine
Kaia Kush and the HIGH TIMES Cannabis Cup

Many Kush varieties have won prizes for their breeders at our annual pot-tasting festival in Amsterdam each November. From the original Skunks of the 1980s to the Kushage, Vanilla and Kaia Kush of the current era, the strain’s potency and flavor are undeniable. While Haze varieties dominate the sativa category in the seed-bank contest, Kushes traditionally prevail among the indicas. Kush strains have also provided the genetic basis for many perennial winners that don’t have the word “Kush” in their names, such as White Widow, Sensi Star and AK-47.

 

Breeders know that one of the best ways to wow discerning judges is to use genetics laden with Afghani heritage. Long prized for its medicinal properties, this is the bud known for its “couch-lock” – a perfect strain for an evening nightcap, but also one capable of changing all your plans when puffed at mid-day. The intense citrus flavor, skunky odor and extremely long-lasting stone aren’t soon forgotten.

 

The Kush and the HIGH TIMES Cannabis Cup have a long and storied history – one that’s guaranteed to continue for many years to come. Future Cups are sure to be won by plants bearing these illustrious genetics, and much of the best hashish in Holland continues to be made from these strains as well. Plus the centuries-long Afghan tradition of separating the trichomes from Kush plants to press into bricks of tasty hash has persisted into the 21st century worldwide.

 

(Read full article here)

 

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